Emergency Transport Scheme (ETS) in Adamawa State, Nigeria – Technical Brief

In July 2013, Transaid, in partnership with Nigerian NGO, Society for Family Health (SFH), received funding from Comic Relief to deliver a five-year programme aimed at improving access to maternal health services for rural communities in Adamawa State. Nigeria had a Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) of 576 deaths per 100,000[1] live births in 2013, one of the highest in sub-Saharan Africa.

Based on lessons learned from previous programmes including PRRINN-MNCH and the Emergency Transport Scheme (ETS) programme in Gombe State, Transaid implemented an ETS in Adamawa State in collaboration with the National Union of Road Transport Workers (NURTW). This programme targeted communities living in 16 Local Government Areas (LGAs), constituting almost 3.1 million people[2], utilising the NURTW’s influence and capacity in coordinating the activities of taxi drivers nationwide.

 

To read the full technical brief, click below.

WHO Bulletin: Use of rectal artesunate for severe malaria at the community level, Zambia

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has reported on a Transaid project in Zambia, which has helped to dramatically reduce severe malaria mortality in children under six years of age, as being “feasible, safe and effective in hard-to-reach communities”. In this official report, the WHO research bulletin identifies the project’s approach – which included a bicycle ambulance system implemented by Transaid – as being highly adaptable, stating it “could be used in other countries with a high malaria burden”.

Zambia’s Health Minister, Dr Chitalu Chilufya, has also praised the success of the pilot. Speaking during the Global Fund’s Sixth Replenishment Conference in Lyon, France, attended by heads of state, heads of government, philanthropists and NGOs, he reinforced the need for partnership to ensure that pre-referral anti-malarial treatments could be financed and rolled out at national level.

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes; and is highly prevalent in young children. Despite it being preventable and curable, the WHO African Region carries a disproportionately high share of the global malaria burden – being home to 92 per cent of malaria cases and 93 per cent of malaria deaths in 2017.

Transaid worked on the initial pilot project (MAMaZ Against Malaria) in Serenje District with Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) between 2017 and 2018, in collaboration with a consortium of partners which included DAI Global Health (formally Health Partners International), Development Data, Disacare, the Zambian National Malaria Elimination Centre and District Health Management Team. Following its success, this year Transaid became part of a scale-up programme, securing matched funding from Grand Challenges Canada and the Government of Canada to enable the initial project to quadruple in size, potentially benefiting as many as 250,000 people in rural Zambia by the end of 2020.

The WHO research focused on a 12-month period during the pilot, using data from three sources including surveys carried out near the beginning and end of the intervention period, health facilities contributing data on malaria to the Zambia Health Management Information System and a community monitoring system. It also collected qualitative data via case studies, feedback from government officials and reports of informal discussions with community health volunteers and communities.

In the year before the intervention, 18 deaths occurred in 224 cases of confirmed severe malaria among children younger than five years of age seen at intervention health facilities (case fatality rate: 8%). During the intervention, three out of 619 comparable children with severe malaria died (case fatality rate: 0.5%).

To read the full report, please click below.

Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport Final Report: Democratic Republic of Congo

This DRC Final Report presents the DRC-specific findings of the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’. This project was carried out in DRC between February 2019 and December 2019.

Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP) is a research programme, funded by UK Aid, with the aim of promoting safe and sustainable transport for rural communities in Africa and Asia. ReCAP comprises the Africa Community Access Partnership (AfCAP) and the Asia Community Access Partnership (AsCAP). These partnerships support knowledge sharing between participating countries in order to enhance the uptake of low cost, proven solutions for rural access that maximise the use of local resources. The ReCAP programme is managed by Cardno Emerging Markets (UK) Ltd.

The research strategy and methodology is broadly based on those used during the initial four country research phase of the project, applied in Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in 2018. After an initial scoping trip to DRC that took place in February 2019, the strategy was reviewed and finalised together with identifying key stakeholders and partners. Activities included a review of the regulatory framework and existing training, a survey of the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycle and three-wheeler taxis, and key informant interviews.

The results of this study can be used by the DRC government and other key stakeholders to better understand the issues related to the use of motorcycle taxis in rural areas and to develop policy and practice to maximise the benefits and minimise the disbenefits. A number of recommendations are presented in this report. A supplementary activity is being explored together with local stakeholders based on the findings of this study, in order to positively influence the conditions for operators and users of motorcycles and motorised three-wheelers.

To read the full report, please click below.

Opportunities to maximise the benefits of motorcycle and motorised three-wheeler taxis in rural Democratic Republic of Congo: Policy Brief

This policy brief has been developed based on a 2019 study of motorcycles and motorised three-wheeler taxis in rural areas of DRC. The aim of the study was to improve the current knowledge and understanding concerning the effective ways of enabling rural people to benefit from the safe use of motorcycles and motorised three-wheelers. The results of the study can be used to enhance the operation of these vehicles to provide safe, affordable and socially inclusive access for rural communities.
The project was supported by the Government of DRC through the local AfCAP partner institution Cellule Infrastructure, a technical body of the Ministry of Infrastructure, Public Works and Reconstruction, and funded by UK Aid.

The use of motorcycles has increased greatly in sub-Saharan Africa in recent years. Motorcycles are often used as taxis, with riders charging a fare to carry passengers or goods. Motorised three-wheelers are also used in some rural areas, although their numbers are far fewer.
Motorcycle taxis play a critical role in enabling rural mobility in Africa. In many countries, they are the only available means of affordable motorised transport for people living in rural communities and have become an increasingly popular mode of transport.
They provide access to healthcare, including in medical emergencies, as well as access to markets and social amenities. They also provide employment and generate a reasonable income, predominantly for young men.

This project is a part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP) funded by UK Aid, with the aim of promoting safe and sustainable transport for rural communities in Africa and Asia. ReCAP comprises the Africa Community Access Partnership (AfCAP) and the Asia Community Access Partnership (AsCAP). These partnerships support knowledge sharing between participating countries in order to enhance the uptake of low cost, proven solutions for rural access that maximise the use of local resources. The ReCAP programme is managed by Cardno Emerging Markets (UK) Ltd.

To read the full policy brief, please click below.

Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport in Democratic Republic of Congo – Progress Report

This Progress Report details progress between April and July 2019 of the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks in DRC’. Strong advancements have been made during the reporting period and all deliverables are on track. The survey of benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheeler in rural areas has been translated into French and Lingala and ethical approval has been granted. A review of motorcycle and three-wheeler taxi-related legislation, training and enforcement has been completed. A wide range of stakeholders have been engaged and have shared their insights on motorcycle taxis and three wheelers. The survey was carried out in two Provinces to obtain information from riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use motorcycle or three-wheeler taxis. A total of 296 interviews were successfully completed and the preliminary findings are presented in this progress report.

To read the full report, click below.

Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport in DRC – Inception Report

This Inception Report details progress during the first four weeks of the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks in DRC’. The main purpose of Phase 1 (Inception) is to build an understanding of the existing situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and to use this understanding to develop the detailed research strategy and methodology. The understanding of the existing situation is being developed through stakeholder mapping, stakeholder engagement and a literature review.

The research strategy and methodology is broadly based on the strategy and methodology used in Phase 1 of the project and applied in Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda (2018 – find reports in the Knowledge Centre). After an initial scoping trip to DRC that took place in February 2019, the strategy was reviewed and finalised together with identifying key stakeholders and partners.

Data collection tools used in Phase 1 have been reviewed for use in DRC. They have been adapted for the DRC context, however the integrity of the questionnaires have been maintained to allow for cross-country comparisons.

To read the full report, click below.

Survey on the Benefits and Disbenefits of Motorcycles and Motorised Three-wheelers: Taxi Riders’ Questionnaire

This tool can be used to better understand the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheelers in rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa.  The tool has five parts which target different groups including motorcycle and three-wheeler riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use these modes of transport. This tool was designed to gather data to inform research on two- and three-wheeler taxi use and training, to influence the development of policy and legislation. The surveys are available in English and French.

This tool was initially designed for and used during the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’ in DRC, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between December 2017 and August 2019. The project was funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and was carried out by a consortium which included Transaid, Amend and TRL.

Survey on the Benefits and Disbenefits of Motorcycles and Motorised Three-wheelers: Taxi Passengers’ Questionnaire

This tool can be used to better understand the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheelers in rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa.  The tool has five parts which target different groups including motorcycle and three-wheeler riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use these modes of transport. This tool was designed to gather data to inform research on two- and three-wheeler taxi use and training, to influence the development of policy and legislation. The surveys are available in English and French.

This tool was initially designed for and used during the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’ in DRC, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between December 2017 and August 2019. The project was funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and was carried out by a consortium which included Transaid, Amend and TRL.

Survey on the Benefits and Disbenefits of Motorcycles and Motorised Three-wheelers: Taxi Owners’ Questionnaire

This tool can be used to better understand the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheelers in rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa.  The tool has five parts which target different groups including motorcycle and three-wheeler riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use these modes of transport. This tool was designed to gather data to inform research on two- and three-wheeler taxi use and training, to influence the development of policy and legislation. The surveys are available in English and French.

This tool was initially designed for and used during the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’ in DRC, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between December 2017 and August 2019. The project was funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and was carried out by a consortium which included Transaid, Amend and TRL.

Survey on the Benefits and Disbenefits of Motorcycles and Motorised Three-wheelers: Freight Owners’ Questionnaire

This tool can be used to better understand the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheelers in rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa.  The tool has five parts which target different groups including motorcycle and three-wheeler riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use these modes of transport. This tool was designed to gather data to inform research on two- and three-wheeler taxi use and training, to influence the development of policy and legislation. The surveys are available in English and French.

This tool was initially designed for and used during the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’ in DRC, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between December 2017 and August 2019. The project was funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and was carried out by a consortium which included Transaid, Amend and TRL.

Survey on the Benefits and Disbenefits of Motorcycles and Motorised Three-wheelers: Non-users of Motorcycle Taxis (not three-wheelers)

This tool can be used to better understand the benefits and disbenefits of motorcycles taxis and three-wheelers in rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa.  The tool has five parts which target different groups including motorcycle and three-wheeler riders, passengers, taxi owners and owners of freight, as well as members of the community who do not use these modes of transport. This tool was designed to gather data to inform research on two- and three-wheeler taxi use and training, to influence the development of policy and legislation. The surveys are available in English and French.

This tool was initially designed for and used during the project ‘Enhancing understanding on safe motorcycle and three-wheeler use for rural transport and the implications for appropriate training and regulatory frameworks’ in DRC, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between December 2017 and August 2019. The project was funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and was carried out by a consortium which included Transaid, Amend and TRL.

Developing innovative approaches to increase rural access to commodities for the case management of severe malaria in Zambia: Final Project Report (August 2018)

This final report presents the key results from the MAMaZ Against Malaria (MAM) project which was established in July 2017.

MAMaZ against Malaria is a one year pilot project, funded by the Geneva-based foundation, Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV). The project aims to devise an evidence-based and sustainable strategy to improve the access of hard-to-reach communities to effective treatment for severe malaria (SM) in a high malaria burden setting.

The project is being implemented by a consortium led by Transaid in partnership with Health Partners Zambia, Development Data and Disacare. The consortium is working in partnership with the Ministry of Health in Zambia, specifically the National Malaria Elimination Centre, and the District Health Management Team for Serenje District.

To read this report, please click below.