Building Resilience and Advocating Change: How bicycle programmes are reshaping their activities to respond to COVID-19 – Webinar Slides

On 25th August 2020, Transaid hosted a webinar featuring representatives from MAMaZ Against Malaria At Scale (Zambia), First African Bicycle Information Organisation (Uganda), Bikes for the World (USA) and Village Bicycle Project (Sierra Leone).

The panel shared insights and key learnings from experiences of adjusting to the COVID-19 pandemic and how these response activities have helped with mobility and access to healthcare, spread of information and livelihoods. The webinar concluded with a Q&A session hosted by Transaid’s Project Manager, Jason Finch.

Watch the webinar recording at this link.

Download the webinar slides by clicking below.

MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response: Gender Based Violence Poster

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, many have faced unprecedented challenges around the world. Like many organisations, Transaid has been adapting and finding new ways of working, and making sure that all staff, consultants and volunteers are protected and safe. Consequently, Transaid has been working to introduce new protocols and ways of working for our colleagues in the field.

As part of this, Transaid have been focusing on awareness raising, establishing hand washing stations and topping up the community food banks as part of the preparedness planning in the MAM@Scale intervention sites in Zambia. This also included the development of materials aimed at supporting awareness raising activities, and to ensure that the people on the frontline of project operations, as well as the people they are supporting, are safe and protected at all times.

The stresses and strains of the pandemic have led to an increase of Gender Based Violence (GBV) reported in communities. MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response has therefore begun to incorporate a GBV campaign in its activities.

Click below to view the Gender Based Violence Poster in English and Bemba.

MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response: Revised RAS Protocol

Since the Covid-19 outbreak, many have faced unprecedented challenges around the world. Like many organisations, Transaid has been adapting and finding new ways of working, and making sure that all staff, consultants and volunteers are protected and safe. Consequently, Transaid has been working to introduce new protocols and ways of working for our colleagues in the field.

As part of this, Transaid have been focusing on awareness raising, establishing hand washing stations and topping up the community food banks as part of the preparedness planning in the MAM@Scale intervention sites in Zambia. This also included the development of materials aimed at supporting awareness raising activities, and to ensure that the people on the frontline of project operations, as well as the people they are supporting, are safe and protected at all times.

Please click below to view the updated rectal artesunate (RAS) protocols for Community Health Volunteers (CHVs), in English, Chewa, Senga, and Luvale.

MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response: Signs and Symptoms Poster

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, many have faced unprecedented challenges around the world. Like many organisations, Transaid has been adapting and finding new ways of working, and making sure that all staff, consultants and volunteers are protected and safe. Consequently, Transaid has been working to introduce new protocols and ways of working for our colleagues in the field.

As part of this, Transaid have been focusing on awareness raising, establishing hand washing stations and topping up the community food banks as part of the preparedness planning in the MAM@Scale intervention sites in Zambia. This also included the development of materials aimed at supporting awareness raising activities, and to ensure that the people on the frontline of project operations, as well as the people they are supporting, are safe and protected at all times.

Please click below to see the “Signs, Symptoms and Response” Posters in English, Bemba, Chewa, Senga, and Luvale.

MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response: Prevention Poster

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, many have faced unprecedented challenges around the world. Like many organisations, Transaid has been adapting and finding new ways of working, and making sure that all staff, consultants and volunteers are protected and safe. Consequently, Transaid has been working to introduce new protocols and ways of working for our colleagues in the field.

As part of this, Transaid have been focusing on awareness raising, establishing hand washing stations and topping up the community food banks as part of the preparedness planning in the MAM@Scale intervention sites in Zambia. This also included the development of materials aimed at supporting awareness raising activities, and to ensure that the people on the frontline of project operations, as well as the people they are supporting, are safe and protected at all times.

Please click below to see the “COVID-19 Prevention Poster”,  in English, Bemba, Chewa, Senga, and Luvale.

MAM@Scale COVID-19 Response: Revised ETS Protocol

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, many have faced unprecedented challenges around the world. Like many organisations, Transaid has been adapting and finding new ways of working, and making sure that all staff, consultants and volunteers are protected and safe. Consequently, Transaid has been working to introduce new protocols and ways of working for our colleagues in the field.

As part of this, Transaid have been focusing on awareness raising, establishing hand washing stations and topping up the community food banks as part of the preparedness planning in the MAM@Scale intervention sites in Zambia. This also included the development of materials aimed at supporting awareness raising activities, and to ensure that the people on the frontline of project operations, as well as the people they are supporting, are safe and protected at all times.

Please click below to see the Revised ETS Rider Protocol During COVID-19 Pandemic, in both English and Senga.

Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings, Remotely and In-Person – April 2020

This brief provides key considerations for engaging communities on COVID-19 and tips for how to engage where there are movement restrictions and physical distancing measures in place, particularly in low-resource settings. It is designed for non-governmental organizations (NGOs), UN agencies, government agencies, and other humanitarian and implementing actors working on health promotion, risk communication, and community engagement for COVID-19.

This document is an initiative of the GOARN Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) Coordination Working Group co-led by UNICEF, the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC), and the World Health Organization (WHO). It was developed jointly by the READY initiative [funded by USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Save the Children, UNICEF, UNICEF’s Social Science Analysis Cell (CASS), IFRC, WHO, CORE Group, Social Science in Humanitarian Action (SSHAP), Anthrologica, United National High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), CARE International, Internews, DAI, Community Health Impact Coalition, BBC Media Action, Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC), World Food Programme, and Catholic Relief Services, with additional input from public health consultant Sanchika Gupta. This document will be updated periodically as new guidance and practices are developed.

Click below to read the full brief.

Training Manual Use of Rectal Artesunate as a Pre-Referral Intervention for Severe Malaria at Community Level

Malaria incidence rates among children are very high in many rural districts of Zambia. Every year, many children die when their malaria progresses to severe malaria because they have not received appropriate or timely treatment. Many of these deaths could be avoided if communities were effectively mobilised around a child health agenda and if WHO-approved rectal artesunate (RAS) – a life-saving pre-referral treatment – were readily available at community level.

Children also suffer and sometimes lose their lives because of delayed identification of other common childhood illnesses. These include severe diarrhoea and acute respiratory infection (ARI). Gaps in knowledge of the danger signs for all these illnesses, and household and community barriers and delays that prevent prompt referral of children are responsible.

This training manual outlines a two-part training approach that can be used to:

Train selected Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) to recognise and administer severe malaria in young children using rectal artesunate (RAS)

Train communities to respond promptly and appropriately to severe malaria, and to other common childhood illnesses

Increasing children’s access to life-saving treatment for severe malaria and other common childhood illnesses requires community members who can identify danger signs and know how to respond, and CHVs who can support and refer patients to the health facility. Both groups need to be trained.

Please click below to read the full training manual.

Emergency Transport Scheme (ETS) Training Guide for Trainers of Bicycle Ambulance (April 2019)

Emergency Transport Schemes (ETS) offer an affordable means of transportation for health emergencies and patient referrals to health facilities, in communities where no formal transport services exist, or where affordable means of transportation lack.

This training manual is intended for trainers who are conducting training on ETS, and introducing bicycles as a solution for community based transport to help expecting mothers and under 5 children with severe malaria in accessing health care when in labour and six weeks after child birth. The topics in this manual have been logically arranged to help guide the trainer follow an approach which aims to maximise the impact of the ETS introduction through clear messaging and instruction.

 The purpose of the ETS training is to develop the knowledge and skills of the community volunteer ETS riders so that they can professionally, safely, actively and effectively contribute to reducing the delay on maternal emergencies and children with severe malaria faced in accessing transportation. This manual acts as a learning tool and reference to be used in conducting training geared towards achieving this. It contains the course layout, proposed timings and gives the trainer comprehensive guidance on critical issues relating to the successful operation of a community managed ETS. It is not meant as a document for general distribution among all ETS volunteer riders, rather for trainers.

Please click below to read the full guide.

Study on Gender Empowerment Outcomes in MAM@Scale Intervention Sites

This report is a study on empowerment outcomes undertaken on behalf of the MAMaZ Against Malaria At Scale project (MAM@Scale). The study looked at the extent to which women and girls in the project’s intervention sites had transitioned from a situation where they had limited power to one where they could challenge power inequalities and access new opportunities for development.

The study was undertaken in December 2019. This was an internally commissioned study, designed and led by a MAM@Scale Senior Technical Adviser who worked alongside the project’s technical team in the project’s two core intervention districts: Chitambo and Serenje in Central Province.

In the project intervention sites a number of gender empowerment-related gains were evident. The extent of change varied depending on the length of time trained CHVs and ETS riders had been active in the community.

The seven ‘gender-smart’ strategies that comprise MAM@Scale’s gender empowerment approach were integral to driving the empowerment gains achieved by the project. There are lessons here for other interventions wishing to achieve empowerment-related outcomes that extend beyond health.

Please click below to read the full report.

Opportunités pour maximiser les avantages des taxismotos et motos à 3 roues dans les zones rurales de la République Démocratique du Congo

Cette fiche technique a été élaborée sur la base d’une étude de 2019 sur les motos et motos à 3 roues dans les zones rurales de la RDC. Le but de l’étude était d’améliorer les connaissances et la compréhension actuelles concernant les moyens efficaces de permettre aux populations rurales de bénéficier d’une utilisation sûre des motos et des trois-roues motorisés. Les résultats de l’étude peuvent être utilisés pour améliorer le fonctionnement de ces véhicules afin de fournir un accès sûr, abordable et socialement inclusif aux communautés rurales.

Le projet a été soutenu par le gouvernement de la RDC par le biais de l’institution locale partenaire de l’AfCAP, Cellule Infrastructure, un organisme technique du ministère de l’Infrastructure, des Travaux publics et de la Reconstruction, et financé par UK Aid.

L’utilisation des motos a considérablement augmenté en Afrique subsaharienne ces dernières années. Les motos sont souvent utilisées comme taxis, les conducteurs facturant un tarif pour transporter des passagers ou des marchandises. Les trois-roues motorisés sont également utilisés dans certaines zones rurales, bien que leur nombre soit beaucoup moins élevé.

Les taxis-motos jouent un rôle essentiel pour permettre la mobilité rurale en Afrique. Dans de nombreux pays, ils sont le seul moyen de transport motorisé abordable disponible pour les personnes vivant dans les communautés rurales et sont devenus un mode de transport de plus en plus populaire.

Ils donnent accès aux soins de santé, y compris en cas d’urgence médicale, ainsi qu’aux les marchés et les installations communautaires. Ils fournissent également des emplois et génèrent un revenu raisonnable, principalement pour les jeunes hommes.

Le projet fait partie du partenariat de recherche pour l’accès communautaire (ReCAP) financé par UK Aid, dans le but de promouvoir des transports sûrs et durables pour les communautés rurales d’Afrique et d’Asie. ReCAP comprend le Partenariat d’accès communautaire en Afrique (AfCAP) et le Partenariat d’accès communautaire en Asie (AsCAP). Ces partenariats soutiennent le partage des connaissances entre les pays participants afin d’améliorer l’adoption de solutions à l’efficacité prouvée à faible coût pour l’accès rural qui maximise l’utilisation des ressources locales. Le programme ReCAP est géré par Cardno Emerging Markets (UK) Ltd.

Pour lire l’intégralité de la fiche technique, veuillez cliquer ci-dessous.

Emergency Transport Scheme (ETS) in Nasarawa State, Nigeria – Technical Brief

According to the World Bank (2017), Nigeria has the fourth worst estimated maternal mortality rate (MMR) in the world of 917 deaths per 100,000 live births. Nasarawa State, located in North Central Nigeria, has been estimated to have a maternal mortality rate (MMR) of 1,000 deaths per 100,000 live births. Among the many factors contributing to the alarming MMR figures, transport availability and affordability are some of the key barriers to safe motherhood in Nasarawa. To address these constraints, Transaid established an Emergency Transport Scheme (ETS) in two Local Government Authorities (LGA) in 2016-2017 that aimed to bridge the gap in available and affordable transport solutions for women seeking institutional deliveries.

Programmatic operations involved the training of ETS volunteer drivers, equipping them with the skills to safely transport women in need to a health facility in the six Local Government Authorities (LGA). Building on the learnings from this pilot intervention, in partnership with the National Union of Road Transport Workers (NURTW), the Ministry of Women Affairs and the Ministry of Health in Nasarawa State, ETS activities were expanded into four new LGAs in November 2017.

 

To read the full technical brief, click below.