An introductory webinar on the topic of Motorcycle Taxis in the Rural Context in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia

This free, introductory webinar on the topic of Motorcycle Taxis in the rural context of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia was held on Thursday 6th of April 2017. This was a Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP) event, made possible with funding from the Department for International Development and facilitated by Transaid.

 

ReCAP is a six-year programme of applied research and knowledge dissemination funded by a grant from the UK Government through the DfID. The overall aim is to promote safe and sustainable rural access in Africa and Asia through research and knowledge sharing between participating countries and the wider community. Transaid would like to thank ReCAP; as without their support, this webinar would not have been possible.

 

The webinar brought together African and Asian transport research practitioners, from within research institutes and universities, regulators and practitioners. Our panel of experts included Mr. Leo Ngowi from the Surface and Marine Transport Regulatory Authority in Tanzania (SUMATRA), Dr. Elizabeth Ekirapa Kiracho from Makerere University in Uganda and Mr. Felix Wilhelm Siebert from the Technical University of Berlin. The discussion was moderated by Caroline Barber, Head of Programmes at Transaid who invited participants to ask questions as well as to contribute ideas for further research into this topic.

 

Please click here to listen to the recording of the webinar. To view the webinar presentations (available in English and French) and other related materials please click on the resources below.

Transaid presentation at Regional Road Safety Seminar in Tanzania (13-14 March, 2017)

This seminar brought together different stakeholders in the transport industry including the International Road Federation (IRF) Geneva, in partnership with the Tanzania Ministry or Works, Transport & Communications to help improve the understanding of road safety initiatives taking place in Tanzania and the wider region and to share best practice.

Projet de recherche AFCAP : Une enquête sur le Rôle des Associations d’Opérateurs de Transport dans le Façonnement des Services de Transport en Zones Rurales en Afrique

Cette étude de cas technique résume l’origine, la méthodologie et les conclusions d’un projet de recherche sur le rôle des associations d’opérateurs de transport dans le  façonnement des services de transport en zones rurales en Afrique. Ce projet a comporté une recherche documentaire systématique, des entretiens et un atelier pour les parties concernées.

2015 – “Developing an East African Community Standardised Driver Training Curriculum and Instructor’s Manual for Drivers of Large Commercial Vehicles”

This technical case study outlines the background, methodology and conclusions of a six month programme that developed a standardised driver training curriculum and instructor’s manual for drivers of large commercial vehicles. The curriculum and instructor’s manual were developed for the East African Community and funded by TradeMark East Africa.

RS52. PSV Driver Training Curriculum

This driver training curriculum is for training drivers of Passenger Service Vehicles. It was developed in Tanzania in partnership with the National Institute of Transport. The aim of this curriculum is to increase the levels of competency amongst PSV drivers, by:

  • Improving Road Safety by reducing the number of road crashes involving passenger service vehicles; thereby reducing the number of fatalities and injuries on the road
  • Increasing the comfort and safety of passengers
  • Reducing vehicle operating cost
  • Increasing passenger service reliability

This curriculum was originally developed for use in Tanzania and may need to be adapted for use in different contexts.

Tool type: Curriculum

RS51. HGV Driver Training Curriculum

This driver training curriculum is for training drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles. It was developed in Tanzania in partnership with the National Institute of Transport. The aim of this curriculum is to increase the levels of competency amongst HGV drivers, by:

  • Improving Road Safety by reducing the number of road crashes involving heavy goods vehicles; thereby reducing the number of fatalities and injuries on the road
  • Reducing vehicle operating cost
  • Increasing reliability

This curriculum was originally developed for use in Tanzania and may need to be adapted for use in different contexts.

Tool type: Curriculum

2014- “Developing a Training Curriculum for Motorcycle Taxi Riders in Tanzania”

This technical case study outlines the background, methodology and conclusions of an AFCAP-funded programme that developed a training curriculum for motorcycle taxi riders.

The objective of this project was to gather, review and assess any existing training curricula and material for motorcycle and motorcycle taxi riders. Through the assessment of this material, gaps were identified and bridged through the development of a new training curriculum. The project also aimed to gather the input and feedback from key stakeholders such as driving schools, boda boda riders, owners and passengers and regulatory authorities in order to develop an effective and well-supported training curriculum.

Transport Management System Training for the Ministry of Health Zanzibar

This report summarises the assistance provided to the MoH in Zanzibar to improve Transport Management Systems in May and June 2014. The support was made possible by UKaid through the Africa Community Access Programme (AFCAP) which is managed by Crown Agents. AFCAP has being leading in the effort to develop a better evidence base for understanding the important role that transport plays in rural health service delivery. It has also been keen to ensure that research gets into practice and supported a successful conference on ambulances and emergency transport for health in Tanzania in March 2014 which shared leading research with a wide range of practitioners. Following the workshop AFCAP was able to support three important follow on activities which responded to issues raised by participants at the workshop and that would all help further AFCAP’s mission of taking evidence and knowledge of what works into practice. This report focuses on the follow on activity which took place in collaboration with the MoH in Zanzibar. Responding to a capacity building request, 12 MoH participants received transport management training in May 2014. In addition a situational analysis was also conducted on both Pemba and Unguja islands and an action plan was collaboratively developed to address key challenges identified. The key recommendations were presented to the MoH Senior Management Team for discussion to seek their support. The recommendations were practical in
nature. Key issues were discussed to seek consensus for adoption as policy guidelines. A detailed action plan was also developed. The overall aim of these activities was to build the capacity of the MoH in transport management and to provide them with the skills, tools and motivation to implement changes that will lead to a safer and more efficient fleet which in turn should lead to improved health outcomes.

Assessment and Development of a Motorcycle Taxi Rider Training Curriculum

Between December 2014 and April 2015, Transaid, working closely with key stakeholders in Tanzania, have developed an appropriate training curriculum for motorcycle taxi riders (for the full curriculum see annex A). This AFCAP-funded programme began by gathering and assessing any existing motorcycle training curricula to identify any gaps that need to be addressed. It was vital that the development of the training curriculum had strong support from the relevant training schools and regulatory authorities as well as feeding in valuable input from the motorcycle taxi riders themselves and addressing the needs of passengers. To ensure this key stakeholder input and support, SUMATRA and the Traffic Police (see Annex B for letter of support) were engaged from the very start and the project team conducted interviews with Driving Schools and regulatory authorities. Two stakeholder workshops were facilitated; one in Bagamoyo, which focused on gathering input from boda boda riders, owners and passengers for the curriculum and one in Dar es Salaam that focused on gaining feedback and input from the key regulatory authorities and ministries. This final report details the outcomes from these activities as well as presenting the final developed curriculum, proposed next steps and proposals for licensing, testing and training.

An Investigation into the Role of Transport Operator Associations in Shaping Transport Services in Africa’s Rural Areas

This final report contains the overall findings of the literature review, interviews and field research undertaken in order to investigate the role of transport operator associations in shaping transport services in rural areas of Sub-Saharan Africa. This AFCAP-funded study explored the role of both public and private transport operator associations in influencing issues such as routing, scheduling and fare setting. The research also explored the role the associations play in shaping rural access as well as the influence they have regarding road safety issues and interaction with police, authorities and other relevant actors. It builds on AFCAP’s review of rural transport services. The literature review revealed that there is very little knowledge of how transport operator associations actually work in rural areas and what positive and negative effects they have on the operation of commercially viable rural transport services. The literature review and small field research study enabled some promising
practices to be identified that show potential for replication/scale up, including strengthening associations, supporting the creation of new associations, promoting cooperation between authorities and associations, mentoring schemes for small operators and capacity building opportunities. A number of specific future research areas and opportunities for demonstration projects have also been identified.

AFCAP/Transaid Emergency Transport Workshop

This final report summarises the preparation activities, discussions, outcomes and conclusions from a two day emergency transport workshop held in Dar es Salaam in March 2014. This workshop brought together ambulance service practitioners and key emergency transport stakeholders from over ten different countries to discuss and explore how to improve emergency transport for health across sub-Saharan Africa. This was a unique opportunity for emergency transport stakeholders to meet and exchange ideas and approaches, which has resulted in discussions about exciting future collaborative work. The workshop saw a call for more effective dissemination of information about best practice for ambulance services, which has resulted in a webpage being created to share material relating to emergency transport best practice. There was also an overall recognition that there are many different components of an ambulance service and that the best mode of transport and best method of care delivery always depends on the context of the situation and the vehicle must match the specifications of the role that it plays. The workshop saw an enthusiasm for innovative solutions to emergency transport issues and a number of successful examples of the use of Intermediate Modes of Transport and lively discussions on the role of motorcycles and motorcycle ambulances and the role of transport, technology and communication. The workshop also provided a platform for a number of interesting case studies where ambulance services have been set up through successful public-private partnerships. This final report summarises the case studies presented at the workshop, reports on emerging themes, direct outcomes and next steps.