Fieldwork Report: An Investigation into the Impact on Social Inclusion of High Volume Transport (HVT) Corridors and Potential Solutions to Identifying and Preventing Human Trafficking

This report presents the findings of the research project entitled “An Investigation into the Impact on Social Inclusion of High Volume Transport (HVT) Corridors and Potential Solutions to Identifying and Preventing Human Trafficking”. The research is funded by the UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) through the High Volume Transport (HVT) applied research programme (2017–2023), which is managed by IMC Worldwide Ltd (IMC). The research aims to broaden understanding of the relationship between human trafficking and long-distance transport corridors and cross-border posts in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), a topic on which little research has been carried out to date. The research, which focuses on Uganda and Tanzania, began in July 2020 and data collection took place over the period January to August 2021.

In September 2021, the project’s Research Strategy Reference Group (RSRG), which comprises key stakeholders from government, civil society and private sectors, was invited to review the preliminary findings of the research and feed into the discussions about implications for policy and practice. Their views are reflected in and integrated throughout this report.

The research findings indicate that there is a case for investing in anti-TIP interventions whenever an HVT road is built or a formal border post established. This should be an automatic consideration as part of the mainstreaming of social inclusion into major infrastructure projects.

Click below to read the full report.

GAVI Study – Outsourcing the Distribution Component of Vaccine and Medicine Supply Chains (2016)

Many government supply chains operate with limited transport capacity, which limits their ability to make last mile deliveries, and results in health workers collecting commodities from the next tier in the supply chain. Outsourcing is often used as a means to improve efficiencies, access new capabilities or access additional capacity, which has yielded successful results in some cases. Outsourcing is also an option when financing for an asset is not available which this is becoming an increasingly important issue now as donors are reluctant to pay for warehouses and trucks for Central Medical Stores (CMS).

This report focuses on how to outsource the physical distribution of vaccines and medical products to a private sector Logistics Service Provider (LSP) in sub-Saharan Africa. It analyses existing approaches to outsourcing, the challenges encountered and lessons learned. A number of outsourcing examples have been identified within the focus countries of Uganda, Zambia, Mozambique, Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. These primarily focus on the distribution of ambient medical products, and incorporate many elements of vertical supply chains such as those part of the government operated CMS supply chain. There are just two examples of outsourced vaccine logistics that have been identified, a public private partnership in South Africa, and one in Nigeria.

The framework has been designed specifically to assist government operated CMS vaccine and medical supply chains in outsourcing distribution services. The report uses templates and documents to describe how to manage an outsourcing in a structured manner.  It also includes a practical toolkit to assist government operated CMS vaccine and medical supply chains in the outsourcing of distribution services. The Outsourcing Framework begins with a list of considerations for outsourcing and explains the process from creating a project plan and RFP, through contracting to implementation and business as usual.

Please click below to download the full report.

GAVI Study – Outsourcing the Distribution Component of Vaccine and Medicine Supply Chains

Many government supply chains operate with limited transport capacity, which limits their ability to make last mile deliveries, and results in health workers collecting commodities from the next tier in the supply chain. Outsourcing is often used as a means to improve efficiencies, access new capabilities or access additional capacity, which has yielded successful results in some cases. Outsourcing is also an option when financing for an asset is not available which this is becoming an increasingly important issue now as donors are reluctant to pay for warehouses and trucks for Central Medical Stores (CMS).

This report focuses on how to outsource the physical distribution of vaccines and medical products to a private sector Logistics Service Provider (LSP) in sub-Saharan Africa. It analyses existing approaches to outsourcing, the challenges encountered and lessons learned. A number of outsourcing examples have been identified within the focus countries of Uganda, Zambia, Mozambique, Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. These primarily focus on the distribution of ambient medical products, and incorporate many elements of vertical supply chains such as those part of the government operated CMS supply chain. There are just two examples of outsourced vaccine logistics that have been identified, a public private partnership in South Africa, and one in Nigeria.

The framework has been designed specifically to assist government operated CMS vaccine and medical supply chains in outsourcing distribution services. The report uses templates and documents to describe how to manage an outsourcing in a structured manner.  It also includes a practical toolkit to assist government operated CMS vaccine and medical supply chains in the outsourcing of distribution services. The Outsourcing Framework begins with a list of considerations for outsourcing and explains the process from creating a project plan and RFP, through contracting to implementation and business as usual.

Please click below to download the full report.

Insights on motorcycles and motorised three wheelers: before and during COVID-19 – Transaid webinar slides

On 30th June Transaid hosted a webinar exploring motorcycle and three-wheeler use in five sub-Saharan African countries. Speakers and panellists held a discussion on the research funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) as part of the Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP), and shared insights on what’s changed with COVID-19.

Speakers: Ms. Caroline Barber – CEO, Transaid. Ms. Kim van der Weijde – Project Manager, Transaid

Panellists: Dr. Nono Mvuama – University of Kinshasa. Mr. Kevin Mubadi – Chairman, Boda Boda Safety Association of Kenya. Ms. Grace Wahome – Programme Director, International Forum for Rural Transport and Development (IFRTD)

Watch the webinar here.

Click below to download the webinar deck.

Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings, Remotely and In-Person – April 2020

This brief provides key considerations for engaging communities on COVID-19 and tips for how to engage where there are movement restrictions and physical distancing measures in place, particularly in low-resource settings. It is designed for non-governmental organizations (NGOs), UN agencies, government agencies, and other humanitarian and implementing actors working on health promotion, risk communication, and community engagement for COVID-19.

This document is an initiative of the GOARN Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) Coordination Working Group co-led by UNICEF, the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC), and the World Health Organization (WHO). It was developed jointly by the READY initiative [funded by USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP), Save the Children, UNICEF, UNICEF’s Social Science Analysis Cell (CASS), IFRC, WHO, CORE Group, Social Science in Humanitarian Action (SSHAP), Anthrologica, United National High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), CARE International, Internews, DAI, Community Health Impact Coalition, BBC Media Action, Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC), World Food Programme, and Catholic Relief Services, with additional input from public health consultant Sanchika Gupta. This document will be updated periodically as new guidance and practices are developed.

Click below to read the full brief.

Portuguese Transport Management Tools (Plus Manual) – Portugueses Ferramentas de Gestão de Transporte (e manual)

You can download T3-T19 as Word Documents using the links below, and  T20 as a PDF. // Você pode baixar T3- T19 como documentos do Word usando os links abaixo e T20 como um PDF.

T3. FICHA DE VERIFICAÇÃO DE VEÍCULOS

T4. DIÁRIO DE BORDO

T5. RELATÓRIO DE ANOMALIAS PARA O OPERADOR DE VEÍCULO
VERIFICAÇÃO DIÁRA

T6. AUTORIZAÇÃO DE TRANSPORTE

T7. PLANO DE MOVIMENTOS PARA O PERÍODO

T8. PROGRAMA DOS TRANSPORTES PARA O PERÍODO

T9. PROGRAMA SEMANAL DE UTILIZAÇÃO DOS TRANSPORTES – SEMANA DE

T10. RELATÓRIO PERIÓDICO DOS TRANSPORTES (tabela)

T11. RELATÓRIO PERIÓDICO DOS TRANSPORTES (narrativa)

T12. INVENTÁRIO DE VEÍCULOS

T13. FICHA DE INFORMAÇÃO DO VEÍCULO

T14. RELATÓRIO DE ACIDENTE INCIDENTE

T15. RELATÓRIO DE SEGUIMENTO DE ACIDENTE INCIDENTE

T16. PROGRAMA DE REVISAO DE VEICULOS PARA 12 MESE

T17. FORMULÁRIO PARA O AVALIADOR PARA  AVALIAÇÃO DE OPERADORES DE VEÍCULO

T18. REGISTO DO OPERADOR DE VEÍCULO

T19. SUMÁRIO DE MANUTENÇÃO DE VEÍCULO

T20. Gestão de Transportes: Um Auto-guião para Gestores de Transportes Locais de Serviços de Saúde Pública